Why Choose WordPress?
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Why Choose WordPress?

August 16, 2019


Good morning thank you for joining us in the
why you choose.>>This event will focus on WordPress.
>>I’d like to introduce our presenters.>>Firstup we’ll have Peter Slutsky, the director
of platform services, in politic, governor, and nonprofit arenas.
>>We’ll A also have Dan Munz, which is the flagship property, and responsible for product
focus, and the release roadmap and shepherding individual products like the bureau’s online
knowledge base.>>I’ll hand it over to Peter.>>>Thank you.
>>I feel like I’m going live on the today show.
>>So first of all, everyone welcome. Thank you so much for joining us this morning.
>>My name is Peter Slutsky.>>I’m very excited to be with you guys.
>>Let’s me give you a little background on who I am and what I’m doing here, then I’m
going to take you through just a couple slides and then you an overview and word press on
some of the stuff I’m trying to expand in government.
>>I started working in politics and lived in D.C.
>>In communications and some organizing on some campaigns, and in about 2007, I got connected
to the folks that were on Facebook, and I was a consultant to them had, which kind of
opened up to whole new word of technology and the intersection of technology and digital
and politicings, which was kind of perfect for my past experience.
>>I went to work for a company called ming, which was doing some really cool things early
on in social networking on and went to an early stage start up which led me to automatic
to WordPress, which has been phenomenal.>>I’ve been there for about a year.
>>It’s been an eye opening experience.>>I love the company. I’ve been a fan and
Wordpress user for a long time.>>I’m not a developer, let me say first off.
>>If you want to have more technical discussions, we can do that and I can try, but chances
are, I will — I will pump the question and get an answer for you, or we can follow up
later.>>On the business team, and my role is to
run or run the space.>>I’ve worked with a lot of developers in
silicone valley and up in New York City where I live and I’ve been super impressed working
isn’t government state.>>I feel like we are still really early on
in the evolution of technology and we have had amazing strides over the last couple years
of open source technology, and you know, working with people like that who you’ll hear from
later and other it is across government.>>It’s just been a phenomenal experience.
>>I do think we’re still super early and we’re the first wave, the first generations
deployed in government, and we’re running a druple wave right now.
>>I’ve gun to have more and more conversations, that people are using WordPress as a blocking
software and they’re using it oftentimes behind a firewall for internal communications, and
inner-agency communications.>>To use it as a full CMS and top line Web
sites and agency, and all levels of government.>>It’s been really cool to see it. What I
want to do is take you guys through the WordPress eco system and introduce you to where we are
today.>>I think this year, in may, we are celebrating
our 10th university.>>It’s a really — we’re not grown up yet,
but we have come a long way and there’s a lot of perception out there A that I want
to work on evolving as — as we now get into our early adulthood.
>>There’s three flavors of word press, the self-hosted, by Matt Melenweg.
>>Anyone can download the software. You can host it on any number of cloud hosts, Amazon,
go daddy, all those — all those — the web host companies that we have relationships
with.>>The at WordPress, in that way, it’s really
a mold of frame model of framework, anything from an agency blog or a small Web site, microsite.
>>And I’ll show you some of those great examples.>>We also say with great power comes responsibility.
>>Working as a developer or a few developers, can you do great things, but it’s also easy
to get — build a claim that is too fast.>>So a lot of times, I’m talking to people
about kind of picking and choosing which plug ins they want and scream line teams and declutter
to make it the most efficient Web site, as possible.
>>It’s one large ultimate site.>>We have about 45 million sites in the political
and nonprofit state.>>Software’s a server.
>>So we do all of the back end infrastructure, hosting, CVN, storage, black up security,
so that what you really have to work with and deal with and think about is the front
end, the design, and the content, and that’s — that’s something that I know that people
working with limited budget constraints or limited resources in terms of development,
that’s something that’s very good.>>I’m working with cities and states a lot
of time that is have great design teams that know CSS and JavaScript, but they don’t have
a good background in CHP or the code base.>>Using WordPress dotted com dot com.
>>It’s a fast hosting and support model for enterprise level Web sitings, and I’ll show
you some examples later, but we power like — a huge amount of the media sites and the
Web sites you use every day.>>We allow you to use your own code base
and plug ins, but you have access to our developers to make sure everything you’re doing is safe
and secure.>>Those are kind of some of the main questions
that I’m getting as I’m talking to folks in the government phase.
>>Automatic is basically the commercial arm, the parent company if you will of word press
dot com.>>>We have all different kinds of products,
and for those of you who are running WordPress right now or thinking about running word press
in your agency, I really recommend you take a look at automatic dot comto see all the
suite of services.>>We have a jet pack and video press and
Gravatar, and all these practice are really plug and play features of the word press echo
system and all of them kind of stand-alone, all different kinds of features.
>>So check that out.>>160 employees.
>>We work all around the globe.>>I’m in Brooklyn New York, but my team is
in Europe, and eastern Europe, and Japan, and Canada. It’s really interesting.
>>And we don’t have company e-mail. We don’t do internal e-mail.
>>We communicate all by a series of internal blogs that are all linked together and so
it’s a super, kind of new aged company and the work we’re doing reaches a ton of people.
>>We reach about half a million people every month.
>>We have some great investors, which you can see here, including New York times.
>>Our core philosophy of WordPress is elegant and customiziable.
>>We’ll want anyone from a local blogger somewhere in the world to CFP dot gov, or
anyone to be able to come in and build things to their needs.
>>We have ATIs and all of these things allow to you take the base software and make it
as robust as you need to.>>And in this role of dominion ebbing budgets
and resources, that is where we’ve seen a lot of the adoption of word press come in.
>>It’s fast and easy, but very powerful.>>You’re very safe, very secure, and super
scaleable.>>This is something that’s kind of the driving
force behind not only our — our software that we built, but the company itself, so
it’s the company and that’s how we’re able to work in this distributed way across the
world and make it work.>>We are strong believers in rapid iteration.
We put out three major releases every year.>>Upgrading word press is super easy, and
for those of you again who are running WordPress right now or are thinking about running WordPress
in the near future, I really recommend that you take a look at the upgrades and updates.
>>I talk to people every day that are running old software and that produces a lot of issues.
>>If you need recommendations or best practices, definitely reach out to me, I’ll give you
my e-mail and I can help you with that.>>We’re the most powerful stand up in the
web.>>We power, I think, 17.9% of the entire
Internet is powered by word press.>>100,000 new sites are joining us every
day.>>We’re getting a lot of back traffic over
to word press dot com.>>We have an amazing core group that works
on the WordPress.org team that manages all of the code base for the plug ins and the
themes that come in to make sure there’s vulnerabilities.>>We’ve done a really great job of building
it, and there’s a ton of resources out there.>>So let me talk quickly about word press
as an enterprise CMS.>>My biggest challenge was WordPress’s by
far the largest CMS around, but when you look at the dot GOV space, it’s fed and he will
stateeral and state.>>That came from the decisions that the White
House made, and a huge Echo system has been used in the U.S.
>>So we’re building with and developing for these people every single day.>>>The — on a CMS, you can customize your
data, decide what everything looks like.>>We have multioffer responsibility where
you can set rolls and permissions.>>So, in some cases there are hundreds, or
in some news rooms, thousands of people
that are practicing the WordPress dashboard and that’s been something that has evolved.
>>There’s also multisite, which is the ability to run multiple sights on on a single code
base within one organization.>>So we see this all the time at government
levels.>>This could be an amazing application for
your agency, you know, to kind of consolidate.>>That’s one of the big things that I hear
are people are working in silos, not cross agencies, but they have different CMSs, they
have no CMSs, they have a DOP line droop CMS, and everything is on an old platform or whatever.
>>I think it was — if we solve more adoption over it, which we will, over the next couple
years of government, it would be an amazing thing for technology and innovation and also
cost savings.>>It’s free.
>>Integration, plug-ins, all kinds of social sense ability abilities.
>>And we have a VIP feature partner program where we’ve gone out and curated and brought
all the companies and client and it is people that are using word press dot com.
>>They get access to these great tools.>>We have a team of developers who developed
a really great set of plug-ins that help with edit flow or for high octano news room, which
could be amazing for different departments that are working inside Google docs.
>>This is a way to work directly within the dashboard within the CMS to edit content and
push it to the — and then publish it to production.>>Word press WordPress is super scaliable.
>>I read this here, or I saw this here.>>A lot of the stuff that you — if you Google
and you start to get nervous or paranoid, a lot of those articles are from 2004, 2005,
2006.>>We’ve come a long way.
>>Word press dot com, is the best example.>>We’re publishing five hundred thousand
posts every day, and oftentimes I will bring our systems team on the phone with in-house
IT folks so you can get all these things that I know CIOs all looking for when they’re scoping
out new platforms.>>>From a security standpoint, that’s what
I hear about a lot, as one of the things from web folks is WordPress is secure, either — and
I hear this all the time — even with conversations between WordPress and druple.
>>These are not save and secure things for the government to be running and that’s totally,
totally not true.>>Oftentimes, the stories that you’ll see
where there’s been a hacker or vulner ability, a developer’s introduced, but that’s why our
team does expensive code reviews.>>We review every live code to make sure
that all of our clients and all the people added WordPress, are really
kind of inoculadated by those issues.
>>We’ve had gotten great feedback.>>WordPress is a SKAL able, secure scale
able platform that can take you to where you need to go.
>>We’re mobile ready.>>The most committing thing is to think about
where the future’s going, especially in the context of government, when it comes to mobile.
>>The fact that, you know, we’re now putting all of this information and data, and giving
it to people to develop, and apps and all kind of integrations with healthcare and what
Dan is doing at the FPD, with consumer data. It’s so exciting and I think we’re super early
on, but WordPress is completely mobile friendly.>>You can making any pretty much any theme
responsive.>>We have great FPIs, and we have teams that
are mobile optimized.>>You don’t have to have a separate mobile
and web development. It’s pretty much all one development pack at this point.
>>Really quickly, a little bit more about VIP services just because I want to make sure
that people know, if you are going to use word press or if you are using word press,
there is a company automatic that is behind the service and that could help port and scale
and be a resource to your — to an agency partner or to a consultant.
>>We do this all the time where we step in and basically get a developer seat for self
hosted support and you can have unlimited access to our team of developers, top WordPress
developers. We will help you with code reviews, advice on plug ins, and also if you want to
host outside of your environment, word press dot com, can be a great option for you.
>>We host a lot of big media companies which I’ll show you.
>>So really quickly, when you’re working with WordPress, these are some of the organizations
using word press, the White House, DOJ, house of representatives, all throughout the Senate,
DOT, state, library of Congress, EPA, and it’s growing every day.
>>I had an exciting conversation with someone whose doing some kind of amazing in mention.
>>In the media front, the New York Times, time, Forbes.
>>It also A accounts for a lot of the energy and the development resources that we put
on into our core products.>>If something is good for New York Times,
it’s going to be good for core software and for you guys.
>>It’s a really good echo system and one that builds and build it is.
>>We are doing a half day workshop on June 13th in D.C.. It’s going to be really fun,
a bunch of our partners, and GSA will present some, agency partners and some interesting
people from — from Washington and around the Washington world.
>>The Washington post, which I don’t know if you guys know this, but the Washington
post actually served a lot of their traffic during the of 2012 campaign, I think at one
point at the end, 85% of traffic was being served through a si WordPress site, which
was super exciting.>>If you want to come to the WordPress event,
shoot me an e-mail, and my twitter handle.>>I would love to have you there.
>>Let me close out by saying, again that I’ve worked with some amazing people. It’s
the place to be, and when I work — when I had meeting in silicone valley and in New
York, everyone is trying to tap into the — the market of, you know, engaging with citizens,
and I think you guys are on the front line of that, so I would love to be a partner and
I would love to figure out ways for — you know for us to drive WordPress inside your
agencies.>>I really appreciate your time and please
get in touch.>>>Thanks Peter.
>>Before I pass it to Dan, I wanted to remind everyone we will take questions at the end
and we’ll also include your follow up e-mail address that we’ll send to attendees.
>>So as I mentioned our next presenter will be Dan Munz.
>>Thanks a lot.>>And thanks everybody for spending sometime
this morning listening to Peter and I talk about WordPress.
>>A little background.>>As was said, I’m the product director for
consumer financial protection bureau, which is D.C.’s newest federal start up agency,
responsibility for lead up product develop and other digital products. I work with amazing
designers, product managers and new media strategists.
>>I’m a proud alumni of digital government.>>Federal government understanding how the
ploddern web and the civic — modern web and civic sector fit together.
>>Today, I’m going to give you a little bit of an overview of the bureau and of consumer
finance dot gov.>>Give you a few thoughts about how to use
it successfully and what to be careful of from our point of view and talk about a few
sort of big, big Harry questions that keep us you up at night.
>>So real quickly, a little bit of background on the bureau.
>>If you want to trace our founding to kind of one sentiment or one thought, it’s probably
this article published in the summer of 2007 called unsafe at any rate, that it is possible
of buying a toaster, but it is able to get a mortgage.
>>Her insight was there ought to be a federal agency responsible for making consumer marketings
and consumer products work for consumers and responsible lenders and prevent exploding
mortgages.>>That was in the summer of 2007.
>>A bunch of stuff happened to the American economy after that and in July 2010, President
Obama signed the branch that created the bureau.>>We’re about 100 or 200ish people.
>>Here’s a picture of some of them.>>By July 2012, we were at cap. This is where
we work.>>Can you see our big friendly logo on the
wall.>>That’s a little bit about the CFPB.
>>Consumer finance dot GOV was launched in February 2011, five months ahead of schedule.
>>The bureau didn’t open are in business in July 2007.
>>Our Web site was not so much the federal agency as the blog of a bunch of people who
were building a federal agency.>>We’ve had to evolve of the time, like consumer
engagement regulations enforcement.>>This is the only dig TAL property.
>>– digital property.>>We do regulation, we do enforcement, a
lot of industry and other partner facing work, but consumers are our core business.
>>To give you a sense of size, we do about 900,000 users a month.
>>We’re no WordPress, but we do okay.>>This is what our stack looks like.
>>We use Google analytics.>>We also use django.
>>I’ll talk more about that in a second.>>There are, to be sure, a lot of technologies
floating around in there that connect you to our sight.
>>As far as the technologies that surface to a user, this is the main stack.
>>So you notice at the top we have WordPress and django there.
>>This is a microcosm. I will think Peter was a little modest, at can it be a full fledged
CMS?>>It’s just uncontroversially true.
>>There are things you have to do to make that happen successfully and you can make
it unsuccessfully.>>Our idea has borne out it is a good system
for doing that and manages system.>>We use WordPress and django.
>>When you think about our blog or our news room or regulations, or testimony, or speeches,
reports E or any of them any products, they can manage and sort of a bulk presentation
way.>>Sometimes referred to as CMSs that they
forgot and they’re not always asom and word press, at least the hosted version we use
as a pretty solid back end, and also lets us clean in distribute work flow.
>>There are plug ins are if that.>>There are CMSs for django tend to not an
do an awesome job.>>What we’re using django for is custom app
development.>>Anything highly interactive or has a really
complex search or complex navigation, and we use it in mostly for things that have relatively
infrequent content updates though there are certainly exceptions to that.
>>We use WordPress when we want more people do fewer things, we want more people to be
able to create a blog post or create a press release.
>>We use django when we want fewer people.>>Django is the language our designers and
developers will use to build an application, and they can build a full application from
bottom to scratch. It can have a lot of complex interaction.
>>Soy it has a lot more flexibility and strength.>>You have to be a developer to get there
there and build with it.>>So to tackle kind of the main question
that frames our time today, why choose word press, these are some of the reasonings that
I think A at least we chose and why we continue to choose it.
>>One is a basic level.>>You have.
>>C that needs M’ing, and the federal, hey, everybody get rid of Web sites came about.
>>Someone tried to count what CMSs, they were all using and 1,200 came back at none,
which is not great.>>So, you know, word press is one of a family
of software called CMS, and if you just have a bunch of content on a site, it lets you
get started really quickly.>>It’s relatively simple to set up and install
and get started.>>It’s really well documented in their documentation.
>>Googling is really your help function.>>Like I said, it’s a pretty usable admin
experience.>>It has a really nice syndication features,
there are plug ins that let you create content on API.
>>It has the potential to lend itself being just one member of your web echosystem.
>>It has arrow a robust side on the development side.
>>There are a lot of core functionalities that are maintain.
>>It’s certainly passed the line between being experimental.
>>It’s absolutely usable.>>The flip side of these things is kind of
if you.>>WordPress is not natively a web application
framework.>>And this is a statement to me that seemed
obvious and I Googled it and it seems to be a relatively controversial statement.
>>WordPress, whatever its ambitions is not yet a full fledged application.
>>It is a CMS.>>I’m absolutely sure that’s possible to
build really complex applications but it’s not what it does best. There are other frameworks
that do it much better, easier out of the box.
>>If you’re going to choose WordPress, you should really understand that the — the kind
of forewalls about what you’d consider to be contend management, are really what you’re
getting, at least that’s been our experience.>>You still need designers and developers.
>>It’s easy to think, I’m going to get word press and I’ll have a great Web site, but
then you find out that, OH, well, you actually need designers to make it compliant, so you
understand what your content types are, you need developers to get the thing running,
to inspect, inspect plug innings and things like that.
>>It doesn’t really free you from kind of needing a great design and team on staff.
>>Some abilities are still maturing, the flip side of the robust plug in community
is some things I think of, is core capabilities are left to plug ins is.
>>One great example, this is called ramp, which is a plug in for a used case which is
moving from contonight a staging server to a production server, selectively in a way
that doesn’t require to you delete your production database and start over.
>>And you know, it’s a great plug in and incredible it was written from us.
>>It doesn’t make moving contend real easy or contend synchs.
>>And then you hope the people who maintain that include that feature.
>>To an end, that’s true with all open software but we found that to be true in a few things
as core functionality.>>And — I think great power comes great
responsibility quote.>>It’s easy do to do things right, but it
can be even A easier to do things wrong it.>>Makes it trivial to upgrade sites, and
if you’re like me, php still looks like matrix code to you.
>>It does make it potentily even easier to do things wrong.
>>Before proceeding, some things have been really helpful for us, one surrounding information
architecture and I mean seriously understanding it.
>>It’s especially true in a scenario where you have at least for us the hosted version
of word press and you have to be pretty thoughtful about what kinds of contend you’ll have, how
they’ll relate, what kind of taxonson mes, a ten or two beyond for us.
>>We were in a major GROETH situation, where if you look at the bower row, kind of a — growth
situation, RAING of range of services, keeping our our digital architecture up-to-date with
the bower row’s public bureau’s public offerings.>>Understanding how you’re going to want
contend to be managed, who you want to have permissions to do that, what permissions you
want them to have and reversion engineered to the question of how can you configure that
in a capability way.>>This one area where I think WordPress,
at least when we started using it, is not super strong and it’s, you know, for obvious
reasons not up to the task of search cross, for example, WordPress keeps all of the stuff
we’ll keep in our django apps.>>We use USA search, which is a great one,
solar is a search library, or python for django.>>Understand how your security shop thinking
about this software.>>What Peter said earlier is absolutely right.
Anyone who said that open on source software is inharentlyy wrong.
>>You’re going to have to take code that someone else wrote and run it our your servers.
>>That’s going to allow to you understand and maybe have a few heart to heart conversations
to understand what’s the process.>>It may turn out to be pain less, or painful.
>>If you dive into this without understanding how they’re thinking about that, it’s almost
certainly to be painful.>>So, the HOR IEZ horizon issues, this is
kind of an issue I flagged earlier.>>Understanding how all the contend we have
relates to one another, and how kind of the information architecture that’s emerging can
be reflected efficiently in the way we divide contend on the back end, something we’re always
driving to do better but keeps us up at night.>>Being smart about reusable code blocks
into modules, we’re learning all the time they come out to be useful and how we can
push those into blocks of functionality we can use.
>>More and more I think you see kind can have really mature web organizations thinking
about the engine that templates and serves sites to the public, being used to manage
and store content in kind of the database.>>And I think our — our kind of hypothesis,
if we’re able to separate those functionalities and able to pull contend from WordPress or
from django or somewhere else and can serve it with the same consistent template, we’ll
number a really good position.>>This is a really important issue for government,
not only because you’re upgrading content management sort of database structures, but
also you’re called on to integrate kind of a third party fees of software that has a
public facing component into the site.>>It can be a real challenge do that in a
weigh that’s kind of brand consistent and so we’re really thinking about investing in
the capability to take the question of templating and sucking contend and serving it on to web
in a really uniform way
that’s really all I have to say.>>I open that’s given you an overview of
what we think about WordPress and how we think about managing web contend and property.
>>Like I said, I really appreciate everyone on the call and I’m eager to take some question.>>>Great, thanks Dan.
>>You had mentioned — both you and Peter mentioned security.
>>This person has a security, would it be able to install on an intranet? I don’t know
if you want to answer that?>>It’s hard to say depending on exactly what
the used case is.>>The person with the question should definitely
reach out to me and I get some more solid recommendations.
>>Yeah, that’s pretty — Dan, I don’t know if have you any specific insight into that.
>>No, I mean the only — the only thing is I go back to my point is that there’s not
really — and this is partly because I think federal security shops are while not new,
not necessarily having standard out of the box procedures for reviewing open source software.
>>It’s hard to say there’s kind of a preferable way to do it.
>>Have a conversation with your security team before you pick a direction to proceed
it.>>Okay. You mentioned, Dan, that you obviously
need developer and technical support to use WordPress.
>>Can you elaborate compared to other CMSs? Is it more, the same?
>>My guess is a little more than druple. My understanding is that you know, partly
because it was kind of born as a CMS, there’s a little bit more configuration complexity.
>>If you think about the spectrum. I think that’s where you really need the least developer
support.>>Still need design because unless you’re
building a design with no front end and maybe you just want want your visitors — if that’s
not the case, you’ll need design.>>Anything hosted internally, if you want
to do it professionally, there’s going to be some level of folks who can think about
the architecture, having it think about scale ability, cashing and serving and things like
that.>>You’d be surprised at like the really dumb
things that can happen.>>And then the top of the spectrum is frameworks
like — like pure web applications like django and ruby and things like that.
>>That are really purely application development frameworks and really, you know, anyone can
get started.>>That’s kind of where a developer or designer
just has to play really — a really dominant role.
>>And also, to weigh in on that a little bit, one of the things that I’ve really been
working on is helping to identify resources, especially seeing them around the D.C. area,
so talking with a lot of companies that do web development and bringing them up to speed
on word press as an enterprise products, so, if — and there are some really great resources
out there.>>So if you know you want to do something
that is a little more complicated than the out of the box piece, let me know and I’m
happy to connect you.>>Also, as I said, part of what we do is
supporting folks that are hosting.>>If you have someone that knows word press
but doesn’t feel like they can extend it to the — the point where you need to get it,
we can be kind of that bridge to help you in that way.
>>I think to answer the fundament will question, all these things, with you’re talking about
doing something that’s bigger than out of the box requires some level of expertise and
that includes developers and designers.>>But for the most part, when I talk to people
about, deciding between WordPress and druple and will let’s just say Junla, it’s never
a question of, this one needs nothing and this one needs something.
>>It’s always a question of, where are the resources, and also what’s the long-term strategy,
like for example with [ INAUDIBLE ], they do a once a year or once a — every ten months
release period, or updates, and that often times will lead to you needing to tear down
the house and rebuild it more often, whereas WordPress is more literate.
>>Could one of you actually show specifically what the back end looks like?
>>I don’t know Peter or pan Dan who would be the best person.
>>Peter, can I pass control to you so we can get a better understanding how it works
and how bee can use it.>>Give me one second.
>>Okay. Let me know with you’re ready, Peter.>>Sure.
>>And in the –>>Yeah, I was going to say whoever had that
question, there’s all kinds of — it might be my own Web site here.
>>There’s all kinds of resources; screen shares online.
>>If this doesn’t answer your question that well, so let me share my screen.
>>Hmmm.>>Maybe Dan you could answer this question.
>>With all the ATI work being done in druple, will it scale or work with WordPress?
>>I’m sorry. Will?>>So there’s a lot of API work being done
in druple. The question was, will it work with WordPress and is there a difference?
Is it –>>So it’s — I mean it’s a little bit tough
to tell. It depends on the individual project, but in general, I think it’s really important
to understand d that one of the — one of the kind of main goals of API work generally
is to make data transport really agnostic to these kind of platform questions.
>>Depending on how — it sounds like the question might be about contend migration
between WordPress, and operating them together.>>If the person wants to drop a little clarifying
note, ed that that’ D’ d great.>>It
the doesn’t lock you in to any of those, your
data’s really portable, it’s reusable in web applications.
>>So if I wanted to build a web application that pulled in my content from druple and
my content WordPress, in efficiencies aside, I believe probably do that.
>>So when you think APIs, you should think enter op er op rat ability.
>>In the abstract, that’s the answer.>>Great, thanks
>>Reporter: SO PETER, ARE YOU-ALL SET?>>SO HERE — HERE’S — I DON’T KNOW — I
HOPE YOU GUY CONSIST SEE IT.>>HERE’S THE BASIC DASHBOARD, IF YOU SEE
PEOPLE WALKING AROUND THE WORLD WITH WORDPRESS OR WP ADMIN SHIRTS ON, ALL THE NERDS LEAK
ME, THIS IS KIND OF OUR CORE — THE CORE TENANT OF WORD PRESS THAT IS KIN OF REMAINING CONSTANT
THROUGHOUT THE TEN YEARS WE’VE HAD IT.>>PETER — CAN I JUST SAY THAT I LOVE THAT
HAVE YOU TWO CATEGORIES OF BLOG POSTS, USIC AND OTHER.
>>I’VE REALLY EXTENDED THIS GREATLY.>>YES, THIS JUST MY OWN PERSONAL BLOG, SO
IT DOESN’T HAVE ANY COMPLEXITY TO IT.>>I’VE SEEN THE NEW YORK TIMES DASHBOARD
AND IT’S ABSOLUTELY INSANE.>>VERY BASIC, PHYSICALLY, HERE OUR — THIS
IS HOW YOU ADD A NEW POST AND A POST SAY CONTENT TYPE THAT YOU CAN EVEN ASSIGN AS — ASSIGN
TO DIFFERENT PARTS OF YOUR WEB SITE.>>IT CAN BE MEDIA T CAN BE TEXT, IT CAN BE
ANYTHING. WE HAVE OBVIOUSLY TAXONOMY AROUND TAGGING AND — SO YOU CAN HAVE ROBUST SEARCH.
THIS IS THE — THE UPLOADERS WHERE YOU CAN ADD IMAGES AND LINKS AND THEN HAVE YOU, IN
YOUR LIBRARY, YOU HAVE ALL — ALL OF YOUR UPLOADED CONTENT, AND IT CAN KIND OF PRACTICE
A STORAGE AREA FOR YOU AND THEN YOU CAN CLICK IN AND IMBED.
>>SO IF YOU’RE WANTING TO PUT BEAUTIFUL HD PHOTOS IN, THOSE KINDS OF THINGS LIKE GREAT.
>>ON ON THE USER FRONT, THIS IS SOMETHING THAT MAY INTEREST YOU GUYS, IF YOU HAVE — SAY
YOU HAVE 30 PEOPLE IN YOUR OFFICE WHO ARE ALL ASSUMING DIFFERENT ROLES AND YOU WANT
THEM TO HAVE DIFFERENT PERMISSIONS, YOU CAN — YOU CAN INVITE NEW USERS AND YOU CAN CHANGE
ROLES.>>TO BE AN ADMINISTRATIVOR, THAT’LL TRIGGER
DIFFERENT CONTROLS OF THE SITE, WHICH IS WONDERFUL.>>WHAT I REALLY RECOMMEND YOU DO IS IT FREE
AND EASY, IS GO TO WORD PRESS.COM, SIGN UP FOR A FREE COULDN’T AND JUST START TO POKE
AROUND, BUILD YOUR OWN LITTLE SITE AND FROM THERE YOU CAN REALLY START TO PLAY AROUND.
>>AND AS I SAID, IT’S REALLY THAT EASY TO AT LEAST GET STARTED.
>>THE STUFF THAT DAN’S TALKING ABOUT, IT’S ALL SUPER INTERESTING, THE LAYERS OF FRAMEWORK
THAT HE’S PUT ON TOP OF IT.>>TO JUST — TO GET A BASIC SITE UP AND RUNNING
THAT HAS PRETTY MUCH ALL THE FULL FUNCTIONALITY, IT ONLY TAKES A MINUTE.
>>WE ALSO HAVE GREAT STATS WHICH I LOVE CHECKING.>>I’LL SHOW YOU WHAT A LOSER I AM RIGHT NOW,
BUT YOU CAN — YOU CAN REALLY SEE KIND OF ALL YOUR STATS HERE IN ONE PLACE AND AUTONOT
AS GOOD AS GOOGLE ANALYTICS, BUT IT’S GETTING THERE.
>>ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I DEFINITELY RECOMMEND, IF YOU HAVE — IF YOU’RE RUNNING YOUR OWN
WEB PRESS IS GO TO JET PACK DOT ME AND INSTALL THAT PLUG-IN.
>>IN DOING THAT YOU GET THE RAL COOL THINGS TO SEE AND TRACK.
>>– REALLY COOL THINGS TO SEE AND TRACK.>>PETER, CAN YOU LIMIT SPECIFIC ROLES TO
SPECIFIC PAGES?>>YOU CAN. THERE’S SOME STUFF THAT YOU CAN
DO, DEFINITELY, AND THAT’S SOMETHING THAT WE GET A LOT OF QUESTIONS ABOUT.
>>SO THERE’S DEFINITELY — THERE’S GREAT DOCUMENTATION.
>>IF YOU GO TO GOOGLE AND TYPE IN WORDPRESS GOALS, THERE’S A LINK THAT I SEND AROUND TO
PEOPLE A LOT THAT CLARIFIES ALL THE DIFFERENT PIECES OF THE WORK ONE DOES.
>>IS THERE ANY TYPE OF SITE THAT YOU WOULDN’T RECOMMEND FOR USING WORDPRESS, FOR EXAMPLE
A TRANSACTIONAL SITE OR A DATA HEAVY SITE? ? I DON’T THINK I CAN RECOMMEND THAT YOU — WHAT
WE’RE SEEING HOW WORDPRESS AT A EVERY LEVEL.>>SOME OF THE STUFF THAT DAN IS TALKING ABOUT
WITH HEAVY DATA TABLE ASKS THOSE KIND OF THINGS, THERE MAY BE INTEGRATION THAT WOULD MAKE SENSE
TO — TO EXPLORE.>>BUT WE — WE’VE DONE SURVEYS OF OUR USER
BASE AND THERE’S A HUGE NUMBER OF PEOPLE THAT ARE RUNNING E EXCEPTION AND INCREASE E-COMMERCE.
>>CERTAIN WILL WASHINGTON POST IS USING EITHER THE PUBLISHING PIECE IN THE BACK END AND A
FRONT ENDS SOLUTION, OR VICE VERSA AND THEY’RE USING THE FRONT END OF THE SOLUTION PORTING
IT THROUGH A DIFFERENT TYPE OF BACK END.>>IT JUST TAKES A LOT OF CREATIVITY AND SOME
DEVELOPER LISTING.>>THIS IS MAN JUST TO ADD TO THAT.
>>I WOULD SAY FOR ALMOST ANY SITE YOU WANT TO BUILD, THE GREAT THING ABOUT THE WEB IS
SOMEONE’S ALREADY BUILT SOMETHING LIKE IT ALREADY, AND SO THERE’S PROBABLY A TOOL THAT’S
REALLY GREAT AT IT.>>AND SO IT’S HARD FOR ME — AT THE END OF
THE DAY IT’S ALL CODE. IT’S HARD FOR ME TO THINK OF A KIND OF SITE THAT YOU JUST ABSOLUTELY
COULDN’T BUILD WITH WORDPRESS, ESPECIALLY IF YOU EXTENT IT WITH THE RIGHT TECHNOLOGIES.
>>YOU SHOULD REALLY KIND OF UNDERSTAND THE OFFERING YOU WANT TO BUILD WHETHER YOU’RE
BUILDING SOMETHING ETD EDITORIAL, OR A REALLY HIGH VOLUME SCALIABLE WAY.
>>THERE ARE TECHNOLOGIES THAT ARE GREATER AND BETTER MEANT FOR IT AND THAT’S WHERE I’D
START.>>IT’S ALSO WORTH UNDERSTANDING THAT THE
TECHNOLOGY IS REALLY JUST ONE ELEMENT.>>IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND THE
TECHNOLOGY PLUS WHAT KIND OF RESOURCES YOU HAVE.
>>IF YOU HAVE, YOU KNOW, WORD PRESS PLUS A BUNCH OF AMAZING DEVELOPERS, THAT MAY BE
A GREAT CHOICE TO BUILD A REALLY KIND OF DATA HEAVY INTERACTION RICH SITE.
>>IF YOU HAVE WORD PRESENT, BUT YOU KNOW, NO DEVELOPER — WORDPRESS AND NO DEVELOPER
HELP, IT’S NOT A GOOD CHOICE.>>A LOT OF PLATFORM HINGES IN PARALLEL.
>>THAT’S ALL THE
ALL THE QUESTIONS WE HAVE AND WE’RE JUST ABOUT AT NOON, SO THANK YOU BOTH TO PETER AND DAN
FOR TAKING THE TIME, AND THANKS TO EVERYONE FOR LISTENING.
>>AS A REMINDER, WE’LL BE SENDING A SURVEY EVALUATION A ALONG WITH SEVERAL RESOURCES
AND PETER’S CONTACT INFORMATION.>>SO THANKS AGAIN EVERYONE AND HAVE A GREAT
AFTERNOON.>>HAVE A NICE DAY.

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